Audio

Calcium, Magnesium, Vitamin D – Carolyn Dean MD ND

Hour One June 29, 2020
Hour Two – June 29, 2020
  • “I’m taking 20,000iu of Vitamin D because my doctor said it was low….I just got out of the hospital with a kidney stone….What do you think caused that?”
  • “I have osteoporosis, and I’m taking large doses of calcium….My joints are swollen and sore….My bone density test is worse….”
  • “I can’t eat green veggies because of my blood thinner….My osteopenia is worse, and I’m worried I’ll end up with osteoporosis….”

Do you recognize any of the above? Do you, too, have a laundry list of evidence that you aren’t feeling well, even though you are taking high doses of several supplements? 

Tonight’s radio show is devoted to the process of clearing up the confusion so you understand how to make good decisions about your supplements. We’ll start this process with clearing any misunderstandings you have about why and how to use magnesium, calcium, Vitamin D, and Vitamin K supplements.

Your Doctor Doesn’t Necessarily Know

It’s unfortunate, but most allopathic physicians have very little education in the area of nutrition. While they certainly are capable of choosing and writing prescriptions for blood tests — so you can use the results as guides for your own wellness research — most physicians don’t fully understand the nutritional implications of these tests. 

For example, let’s say you have your Vitamin D tested; did you know that Vitamin D levels are connected to your magnesium, calcium, and Vitamin K levels? But if your Vitamin D levels are low, chances are that your doctor will give you high doses of Vitamin D because their training tells them the low score is a problem, but they won’t adjust anything else. They will correct your so-called, “Vitamin D deficiency” in isolation from its other nutrient partners.

Magnesium, Calcium, Vitamin D and Vitamin K are Partners

Since readers are so used to the allopathic approach of “isolate and treat,” they don’t understand that there is a strong relationship among magnesium, calcium, Vitamin D, and Vitamin K. 

Why Isolating Each Nutrient Is an Issue

In my 2017 Edition of The Magnesium Miracle, I share information about the relationship among magnesium, calcium, and Vitamin D:

Magnesium is required for many steps along the pathway of vitamin D metabolism, including transformation of vitamin D from its storage form (which is also the supplement form) to its active form. That means if you take extremely high doses of vitamin D, you can plummet into magnesium deficiency and not know what’s happening.

Calcium is a mineral that is essential for health, however, calcium is a mineral that Vitamin D grabs from the diet and holds on to for dear life. When you start taking high doses of Vitamin D, you can accumulate so much calcium that it overrides your magnesium and forces it out of your body to over-utilize magnesium, block magnesium, purge magnesium, build up calcium (causing calcification), and propel people into serious magnesium deficiency….

Later in the book, I add information about the role of Vitamin K:

For the proper functioning of vitamin D, calcium, and magnesium, I recommend vitamin K2. Dr. Weston Price, the inspiration for the Weston A. Price Foundation, discovered the X factor, which turned out to be Vitamin K2. Vitamin K2 helps guide calcium into the bones, where it is needed, instead of leaving it circulating to calcify blood vessels and other soft tissues.

Our Opening Scenarios Revisited

Let’s look at our opening scenarios through a lens that the nutrients involved are partners and that each and every one of them is necessary for balance and wellness.

“I’m taking 20,000iu of Vitamin D because my doctor said it was low….I just got out of the hospital with a kidney stone….” My thought is that this person is supplementing too much Vitamin D when he/she is magnesium deficient. It’s also possible because of this nutrient imbalance that calcium isn’t moving into the bones effectively. 

“I have osteoporosis, and I’m taking large doses of calcium….My joints are swollen and sore….My bone density test is worse….” In this case, I would suggest supplementing more magnesium and gradually decreasing calcium supplementation. If someone is magnesium deficient, supplementing calcium will not increase bone health. 

 “I can’t eat green veggies because of my blood thinner….My osteopenia is worse, and I’m worried I’ll end up with osteoporosis….” As I mentioned earlier, Vitamin K guides calcium into the bones. Could it be that this writer has a Vitamin K deficiency?  

Learning about the role of nutrients and nutrition is essential to maintaining health, vitality and longevity.  Tonight, please join me on my weekly call-in talk radio show when we will learn more about the relationship between calcium, magnesium, vitamin D and K2 along with a wide range of other health topics. You will love hearing the beneficial interactions with our callers and hosts alike including the body/mind connection, identifying the ‘conflict’ in the ‘conflict basis’ of disease and much more!!

If you yourself are unable to join the live broadcast, you have the option to email me and have your question or comment included in our MailBag. Remember, the valuable information, suggestions, and insights about your health choices you hear on the show should always be discussed with your doctor.

Dr. Carolyn Dean LIVE Radio Broadcast

Every Monday on Dreamvisions7.com

4PM Pacific 7PM Eastern

How to Participate in the Show:

1) If you have a question for Dr. Dean:
email your question prior to the show to questions@drcarolyndeanlive.com

2) If you’d like to speak directly to Dr. Dean during the show:

CALL 646-558-8656
ID: 8836953587 press # to Ask a Question or Chat

3). WATCH Live Video – Close Captioning

D7RN Radio/YouTube VIDEO Link

https://www.youtube.com/user/Dreamvisions7Radio

4). LISTEN Live Audio:
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If you are unable to attend the live broadcast,  just visit the archive

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